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Everett Miller
Everett Miller

Core Quality Quadrant Model by Daniel Ofman - SlideShare


Daniel Ofman Core Qualities: A Guide to Human Resources




Have you ever wondered what makes you unique as a person? What are the strengths that define your personality and character? And how can you use them to improve your performance, relationships, and happiness?




daniel ofman core qualities pdf download



If you are interested in these questions, then you might want to learn more about core qualities. Core qualities are the natural positive qualities that you have not learned, but that are part of who you are. They are the gifts that you bring to the world, and that make you valuable and attractive to others.


But core qualities also have a dark side. When they go too far or are used inappropriately, they can become pitfalls. Pitfalls are the weaknesses that hinder your effectiveness, and that annoy or frustrate others. They are the distortions of your core qualities, and they can harm your reputation and well-being.


Fortunately, there is a way to balance your core qualities and avoid your pitfalls. That is by embracing your challenges. Challenges are the positive opposites of your pitfalls, and they are the areas where you can grow and improve. They are the supplements that you need to add to your core qualities, and they can enhance your potential and satisfaction.


But challenges also have a downside. When they are overdone or imposed on others, they can cause allergies. Allergies are the triggers that cause conflict and irritation between people. They are the behaviors that you cannot stand or tolerate in others, and they can damage your communication and collaboration.


How can you understand these four aspects of your personality better? And how can you use them to optimize your human resources? That is where Daniel Ofman comes in. Daniel Ofman is a Dutch management consultant, trainer, and author who developed a simple but powerful tool called the core quality quadrant model. This model helps you to identify your core qualities, pitfalls, challenges, and allergies, and to use them for personal and professional development.


In this article, we will explain what the core quality quadrant model is, how it works, and how you can use it for yourself and others. We will also provide you with a link to download the PDF of Daniel Ofman's book "Core Qualities: A Gateway to Human Resources", where you can find more information and examples of the model. So, let's get started!


Core Qualities: The Strengths of Your Personality




Core qualities are the natural positive qualities that you have not learned, but that are part of who you are. They are the gifts that you bring to the world, and that make you valuable and attractive to others. They are the essence of your personality, and they express your true self.


Core qualities are not skills or competencies that you can acquire or lose. They are innate and stable, and they do not depend on the situation or the context. They are always present in you, and they influence your behavior, thoughts, feelings, and motivations.


Core qualities are also not preferences or opinions that you can change or adapt. They are deep and fundamental, and they reflect your values and beliefs. They are what you stand for, and they guide your choices and actions.


How can you identify your core qualities? There are several ways to do so, such as:


  • Asking yourself what you are good at, what you enjoy doing, what you are proud of, what you admire in yourself, and what others appreciate or compliment you on.



  • Asking others what they think are your core qualities, what they like or respect about you, what they see as your strengths or talents, and what they value or benefit from in your relationship.



  • Looking at your past experiences and achievements, and analyzing what core qualities helped you to succeed, overcome challenges, solve problems, or make a difference.



  • Using personality tests or assessments that can give you insights into your core qualities, such as the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Enneagram, the StrengthsFinder, or the DISC profile.



Some examples of core qualities are:


Core QualityDescription


CreativityThe ability to generate new ideas, solutions, or products that are original and valuable.


DeterminationThe ability to pursue a goal or a task with persistence, focus, and commitment.


FlexibilityThe ability to adapt to changing circumstances, demands, or expectations with ease and openness.


HonestyThe ability to be truthful, sincere, and authentic in one's words and actions.


LoyaltyThe ability to be faithful, supportive, and reliable in one's relationships and obligations.


OptimismThe ability to have a positive outlook on life, and to expect the best possible outcomes.


SensitivityThe ability to perceive and understand one's own and others' emotions, needs, and perspectives.


WisdomThe ability to have sound judgment, knowledge, and experience that can be applied to various situations.


Core qualities have many benefits for yourself and others. Some of them are:


  • They make you unique and authentic. Your core qualities distinguish you from others, and they show who you really are. They give you a sense of identity and purpose.



  • They make you confident and happy. Your core qualities allow you to express yourself fully, and to use your potential. They give you a sense of fulfillment and satisfaction.



  • They make you attractive and influential. Your core qualities draw others to you, and they inspire them to follow you. They give you a sense of charisma and leadership.



  • They make you productive and successful. Your core qualities help you to achieve your goals, overcome challenges, solve problems, or create value. They give you a sense of competence and excellence.



  • They make you resilient and adaptable. Your core qualities enable you to cope with stress, uncertainty, change, or adversity. They give you a sense of strength and flexibility.



  • They make you compassionate and empathetic. Your core qualities allow you to connect with others, understand their feelings, needs, and perspectives. They give you a sense of care and kindness.



Pitfalls: The Dark Side of Your Core Qualities




Pitfalls are the weaknesses that hinder your effectiveness, and that annoy or frustrate others. They are the distortions of your core qualities, and they can harm your reputation and well-being. They are the excesses or misuses of your core qualities, and they express your false self.


Pitfalls are not flaws or defects that you need to fix or eliminate. They are the consequences of your core qualities, and they are inevitable and natural. They are always potential in you, and they can be triggered by stress, pressure, or fear.


Pitfalls are also not habits or behaviors that you can change or modify. They are ingrained and automatic, and they are hard to control or suppress. They are what you do without thinking, and they influence your reactions, decisions, emotions, and impulses.


How can you avoid your pitfalls? There are several ways to do so, such as:


  • Being aware of your core qualities and how they can go too far or be used inappropriately.



  • Being mindful of your pitfalls and how they affect yourself and others.



  • Being open to feedback from others and how they perceive your pitfalls.



  • Being willing to adjust your behavior and tone down your core qualities when needed.



  • Being proactive in seeking your challenges and developing your opposite qualities.



Some examples of pitfalls are:


PitfallDescription


ChaoticThe pitfall of being creative. It means being disorganized, unstructured, or messy.


StubbornThe pitfall of being determined. It means being inflexible, dogmatic, or rigid.


FickleThe pitfall of being flexible. It means being indecisive, inconsistent, or unreliable.


DishonestThe pitfall of being honest. It means being rude, offensive, or tactless.


DependentThe pitfall of being loyal. It means being clingy, submissive, or needy.


NaiveThe pitfall of being optimistic. It means being unrealistic, ignorant, or gullible.


EmotionalThe pitfall of being sensitive. It means being moody, touchy, or sentimental.


ArrogantThe pitfall of being wise. It means being pretentious, condescending, or know-it-all.


Pitfalls have many drawbacks for yourself and others. Some of them are:


  • They make you unauthentic and ineffective. Your pitfalls diminish your core qualities, and they show a distorted version of yourself. They reduce your identity and purpose.



  • They make you insecure and unhappy. Your pitfalls prevent you from expressing yourself fully, and from using your potential. They reduce your fulfillment and satisfaction.



  • They make you repulsive and powerless. Your pitfalls push others away from you, and they discourage them to follow you. They reduce your charisma and leadership.



  • They make you unproductive and unsuccessful. Your pitfalls hinder you from achieving your goals, overcoming challenges, solving problems, or creating value. They reduce your competence and excellence.



  • They make you vulnerable and rigid. Your pitfalls impair your ability to cope with stress, uncertainty, change, or adversity. They reduce your strength and flexibility.



  • They make you insensitive and selfish. Your pitfalls disconnect you from others, ignore their feelings, needs, and perspectives. They reduce your care and kindness.



Challenges: The Opportunities for Growth and Balance




Challenges are the positive opposites of your pitfalls, and they are the areas where you can grow and improve. They are the supplements that you need to add to your core qualities, and they can enhance your potential and satisfaction. They are the complements of your personality, and they express your ideal self.


Challenges are not threats or risks that you need to avoid or fear. They are the opportunities for learning and development, and they are beneficial and rewarding. They are always possible for you, and they can be achieved by effort, practice, or support.


Challenges are also not opposites or enemies of your core qualities. They are the balances and harmonies of your core qualities, and they are compatible and synergistic. They are what you need to do more of, and they influence your growth, improvement, and balance.


How can you embrace your challenges? There are several ways to do so, such as:


  • Being curious about your challenges and how they can help you to optimize your core qualities.



  • Being positive about your challenges and how they can bring you more happiness and satisfaction.



  • Being realistic about your challenges and how they can be attainable and measurable.



  • Being committed to your challenges and how they can be integrated into your daily life and habits.



  • Being supportive of your challenges and how they can be encouraged and reinforced by others.



Some examples of challenges are:


ChallengeDescription


StructureThe challenge of being creative. It means being organized, planned, or orderly.


CooperationThe challenge of being determined. It means being flexible, open-minded, or collaborative.


DecisivenessThe challenge of being flexible. It means being decisive, consistent, or reliable.


TactThe challenge of being honest. It means being polite, respectful, or diplomatic.


IndependenceThe challenge of being loyal. It means being autonomous, assertive, or self-reliant.


RealismThe challenge of being optimistic. It means being realistic, informed, or critical.


RationalityThe challenge of being sensitive. It means being logical, objective, or analytical.


HumilityThe challenge of being wise. It means being modest, approachable, or curious.


Challenges have many advantages for yourself and others. Some of them are:


  • They make you authentic and effective. Your challenges optimize your core qualities, and they show a balanced version of yourself. They enhance your identity and purpose.



  • They make you confident and happy. Your challenges enable you to express yourself fully, and to use your potential. They enhance your fulfillment and satisfaction.



  • They make you attractive and influential. Your challenges draw others to you, and they inspire them to follow you. They enhance your charisma and leadership.



  • They make you productive and successful. Your challenges help you to achieve your goals, overcome challenges, solve problems, or create value. They enhance your competence and excellence.



  • They make you resilient and adaptable. Your challenges improve your ability to cope with stress, uncertainty, change, or adversity. They enhance your strength and flexibility.



  • They make you compassionate and empathetic. Your challenges connect you with others, understand their feelings, needs, and perspectives. They enhance your care and kindness.



Allergies: The Triggers for Conflict and Irritation




Allergies are the triggers that cause conflict and irritation between people. They are the behaviors that you cannot stand or tolerate in others, and they can damage your communication and collaboration. They are the excesses or misuses of your challenges, and they express your intolerant self.


Allergies are not preferences or opinions that you can respect or accept. They are the judgments or criticisms that you have towards others, and they are subjective and biased. They are always present in you, and they can be provoked by stress, pressure, or fear.


Allergies are also not opposites or enemies of your pitfalls. They are the reflections and projections of your pitfalls, and they are incompatible and antagonistic. They are what you do too little of, and they influence your reactions, decisions, emotions, and impulses.


How can you deal with your allergies? There are several ways to do so, such as:


  • Being aware of your allergies and how they relate to your pitfalls and challenges.



  • Being mindful of your allergies and how they affect yourself and others.



  • Being open to feedback from others and how they perceive your allergies.



  • Being willing to adjust your behavior and tone up your challenges when needed.



  • Being proactive in seeking your core qualities and developing your opposite qualities.



Some examples of allergies are:


AllergyDescription


BoringThe allergy of being creative. It means being dull, unoriginal, or predictable.


WeakThe allergy of being determined. It means being passive, indecisive, or submissive.


StubbornThe allergy of being flexible. It means being inflexible, dogmatic, or rigid.


DishonestThe allergy of being honest. It means being lying, deceptive, or manipulative.


DisloyalThe allergy of being loyal. It means being unfaithful, unsupportive, or unreliable.


PessimisticThe allergy of being optimistic. It means being negative, hopeless, or cynical.


InsensitiveThe allergy of being sensitive. It means being cold, uncaring, or indifferent.


IgnorantThe allergy of being wise. It means being uninformed, naive, or foolish.


Allergies have many consequences for yourself and others. Some of them are:


  • They make you intolerant and defensive. Your allergies diminish your challenges, and they show a biased version of yourself. They reduce your growth and balance.



  • They make you angry and unhappy. Your allergies prevent you from accepting others fully, and from learning from them. They reduce your happiness and satisfaction.



  • They make you hostile and isolated. Your allergies push others away from you, and they create conflict and tension with them. They reduce your communication and collaboration.



  • They make you unproductive and unsuccessful. Your allergies hinder you from achieving your goals, overcoming challenges, solving problems, or creating value with others. They reduce your competence and excellence.



  • They make you vulnerable and rigid. Your allergies impair your ability to cope with stress, uncertainty, change, or adversity with others. They reduce your strength and flexibility.



  • They make you insensitive and selfish. Your allergies disconnect you from others, ignore their feelings, needs, and perspectives. They reduce your care and kindness.



How to Use the Core Quality Quadrant Model




The core quality quadrant model is a simple but powerful tool that helps you to identify your core qualities, pitfalls, challenges, and allergies, and to use them for personal and professional development. The model consists of four quadrants that represent the four aspects of your personality, as shown in the figure below:



Figure 2 - Core Quality Quadrant Model (Ofman)


To use the core quality quadrant model, you can follow these steps:


Step 1: Create your own core quality quadrant




To create your own core quality quadrant, you need to fill in the four quadrants with your core quality, pitfall, challenge, and allergy. You can use the methods mentioned above to identify your core quality, such as asking yourself or others, looking at your past experiences or achievements, or using personality tests or assessments. Once you have your core quality, you can derive your pitfall by asking yourself what happens when you exaggerate or misuse your core quality. Then you can derive your challenge by asking yourself what is the positive opposite of your pitfall. Finally, you can derive your allergy by asking yourself what is the negative opposite of your challenge.


For example, if your core quality is creativity, then your pitfall could be chaos, your challenge could be structure, and your allergy could be boredom. Your core quality quadrant would look like this:



Figure 3 - Core Quality Quadrant Model Example


You can create multiple core quality quadrants for yourself, as you may have more than one core quality. You can also create core quality quadrants for others, such as your colleagues, friends, or family members, by asking them or observing them.


Step 2: Use the core quality quadrant for self-awareness and development




Once you have your core quality quadrant, you can use it to increase your self-awareness and development. You can use it to:


Recognize your


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